English Modal Auxiliary Verbs: May, Might, Can, Could, Will, Would, Shall, Should, Must, Need English Daily Use Book 20

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Manik Joshi #ad - Maybe' means 'perhaps'Maybe he came to know something secret and was removed from the post. Also note:difference between 'may' and 'Can''May' is more formal than 'Can''May' is mostly used in 'formal' English. Can' is mostly used in 'informal' or spoken English. It is not common. Always use 'may'Never use 'might not' to refuse permission.

It is mostly used in indirect questions. I wonder if I might work on your computer. Note: 'maybe' is an adverb. Perhaps you would attract. He might have to go Perhaps he had to go. Might' is frequently used In conditional sentencesIf I pursued studies further, I might learn more. If i had pursued studies further, I might have learned more.

English Modal Auxiliary Verbs: May, Might, Can, Could, Will, Would, Shall, Should, Must, Need English Daily Use Book 20 #ad - Might' has limitations while 'asking permission''Might' is very polite and formal. Always use 'may not'difference between 'May' and 'Might'Note: 'Might' is the past equivalent of 'may' in indirect speech. But it is used in the same way as 'may' to talk about the present or future. May' denotes more possibility/probability'might' denotes less possibility/probabilityIt may rain tomorrow Perhaps a 75% chance - More possibleIt might rain tomorrow Perhaps a 50% chance - Less possible'Might' also denotes 'would perhaps'You might attract President's attention later.

Modal auxiliary verb or 'modal verb' or 'modalauxiliary' is a verb that is used with another verb not a modal verbto express ability, possibility, obligation, intention, permission, probability, necessity, etc.

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Making Comparisons in English: Similarities, Dissimilarities, Degrees English Daily Use Book 10

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Manik Joshi #ad - Prefer/would prefer + -ing form of verb + To + -ING form of Verb, ORB. This book covers the following topics:structure 1a -- comparison of actions - istructure 1b -- comparison of actions - iistructure 2a -- Comparison of Qualities - IStructure 2b -- Comparison of Qualities - IIStructure 3a -- Specific Similarity - Quality AdjectivesStructure 3b -- Specific Similarity - Quality NounsStructure 4 -- Comparison of Number/QuantityStructure 5a -- As + Much/Many, etc.

. Regular and Irregular Forms of Adjectives10b. Interchange of Positive and Superlative Degrees10d. Interchange of positive, comparative and superlative degreesexercise - 1exercise - 2sample this:structure 1a -- comparison of actions - ipattern 1:affirmative sentence-ING form of Verb + Verb 'Be' + As + Adjective + As + -ING form of VerbOrIt + Verb 'Be' + As + Adjective + To + Ordinary Verb + As + Ordinary VerbWriting is as easy as thinking.

Making Comparisons in English: Similarities, Dissimilarities, Degrees English Daily Use Book 10 #ad - Jogging is as easy as exercising. Closing is as easy as opening. Designing is as easy as publishing. It is as easy to write as think. It is as easy to jog as exercise. It is as easy to close as open. It is as easy to design as publish.

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Using Tenses in English: Past, Present, Future English Daily Use Book 15

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Manik Joshi #ad - Negative pattern -subject + auxiliary verb 'do/does' + not + first form of main verb + other wordsAuxiliary Verb 'Does' is used with subject 'He and She' + All Singular Subjects. Auxiliary verb 'do' is used with subject 'I, We, You and They' + All Plural Subjects. Examples:He/She does not talk. I/we/you/they do not talk.

Most buses do not cater to interior parts of the villages. He does not know what to say. I/we/you/They talk. We seek opportunity to chart out our own course. Lean margin of victory or defeat gives an impression of a tough contest. Nowadays, voters value development over other issues. They want civic amenities and employment opportunities.

Using Tenses in English: Past, Present, Future English Daily Use Book 15 #ad - B. This book covers the following topics: what are "tenses"?agreement between subject and verbtwenty-four auxiliary verbsregular and irregular verbspresent tensepresent indefinite tensepresent continuous/progressive tensepresent perfect tensepresent Perfect Continuous/Progressive TensePAST TENSEPast Indefinite TensePast Continuous/Progressive TensePast Perfect TensePast Perfect Continuous/Progressive TenseFUTURE TENSEFuture Indefinite TenseFuture Continuous/Progressive TenseFuture Perfect TenseFuture Perfect Continuous/Progressive TenseUseful NotesExercisesSample This:Tenses could be defined as "any of the form of a verb that may be used to show the time of the action or an event or state expressed by the verb".

There are three kinds of tenses:the past tense - the form of a verb that usually expresses an action that happened in the pastaction happened before presentthe present tense - the form of a verb that usually expresses an action that happens at this timeaction happens in presentthe future tense - the form of a verb that usually expresses an action that will happen in futureAction will happen after presentEACH OF THESE THREE KINDS OF SENTENCES HAS FOUR TYPES OF FORMS:Indefinite or Simple FormContinuous or Progressive FormPerfect FormPerfect Continuous or Perfect Progressive FormEACH OF THESE FOUR TYPES OF FORMS HAS FOUR KINDS OF STATEMENTS:Affirmative Statement --Used to Show 'Agreement'Negative Statement --Used to Show 'Disagreement'Interrogative Statement --Used to Ask 'Question'Interrogative-Negative Statement --Used to Ask 'Question' and Show 'Disagreement'Present Indefinite TenseExpresses -Permanent situation in the past, present and futureExample: Our family lives in Seattle.

General truth fact or statementExample: Clean water is fundamental to public health.

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How to Start a Sentence: Words to Begin Sentences English Daily Use Book 1

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Manik Joshi #ad - Besides, 'if', words such as 'to' 'in' 'with', 'after' are also used to begin asentence. Here, you will learn various words and phrases to start a sentence with. Important note:starting a sentence with 'and' or 'but' is correct or not!Using 'And' or 'But' to begin a sentence is generally considered grammatically Incorrect.

But there is no hard and fast rule in this regard. They might be question words what, where, etc. This book covers the following topics: how to start a sentencestart a sentence -- using 'as'start a sentence -- using 'after' and 'before'start a sentence -- using 'by'start a sentence -- using 'for/fromstart a sentence -- using 'if'start a sentence -- using 'of/on/out'start a sentence -- using 'to'start a sentence -- using 'in'start a Sentence -- Using 'WITH'Start a Sentence -- Using 'QUESTION WORDS'Start a Sentence -- Using 'ING' FORM of VERBSStart a Sentence -- Using 'PAST PARTICIPLES'Start a Sentence -- Using '-LY Words'Start a Sentence -- Using 'PRONOUNS'Start a Sentence - MiscellaneousExercises: 1A and 1BExercises: 2A and 2BSample This:There are different ways to start a sentence in English.

How to Start a Sentence: Words to Begin Sentences English Daily Use Book 1 #ad - . So, you can use 'and' or 'But' to begin a sentence. Using pronoun i, he, she, they, we, you, it is the most popular way to begin a sentence. Butthis is not hard and fast rule. Particularly in spoken English, starting a sentence with 'And' or 'But' is common. How to start a sentence -- Using 'AS'As a matter of fact no notice was given to anyone.

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Ending Sentences with Prepositions: Useful Tips English Daily Use Book 23

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Manik Joshi #ad - Sometimes, using preposition at the end of a sentence seems better than using it in the middle or beginning of a sentence. Ending a sentence with a preposition - aboutan ad agency's job is to take a brand to consumers and communicate the proposition well to them, so that they understand what the brand is all about.

Could you tell me what he was on about?For last 5 years, he has been part of the corruption in our country that we are angry about. Governor said even clerical staff could easily address some of the complaints that students were approaching him about. He warned her against commenting on things he is not authorized to speak about.

Her success is all everybody in the town is talking about. I decided to leave my career, and concentrate my energies in an area which I was passionate about. I do not know which video you are talking about. Intimate details of his life have been flung about. There are many healthcare centers worth talking about.

Ending Sentences with Prepositions: Useful Tips English Daily Use Book 23 #ad - This is the player I told you about. This is what the fight is about. What are all these girls doing about?what are you getting upset about?What are you thinking about?What did you want to read about?What do they want to talk about? The word preposition expresses "position before" so it is improper to place a preposition at the end! This is, however, not a rule.

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Interchange of Active and Passive Voice: Patterns and Examples English Daily Use Book 12

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Manik Joshi #ad - First or second Form of Verb2. Past perfect Continuous Tense3. Verb followed by --ING form or an Infinitive17. When you want to make the active object more important. 3. Have/has/had + Past Participle4. Middle voiceexercise -- 01exercise -- 02exercise -- 03sample This:VOICE - DefinitionVoice refers to the form of a verb that shows whether the subject of a sentence performs the action or is affected by it.

Active voice - definitionThe form of a verb in which subject is the person or thing that performs the action. Example:They finished the work. Subject -- "they", verb -- "finished", object -- "work"In this sentence, the subject they acts on the object work. Other examples:The teacher praises him. She posted the letter.

Interchange of Active and Passive Voice: Patterns and Examples English Daily Use Book 12 #ad - I buy new books. We will celebrate his birthday. Passive voice - definitionThe form of a verb in which subject is affected by the action of the verb. Important note -- the object of the active voice becomes the subject in the passive voice. Example:The work was finished by them. Subject -- "work", passive verb -- "was finished", object -- "them"In this example, the subject work is not the doer; it is being acted upon by the doer 'them'Other Examples:He is praised by the teacher.

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Creating Long Sentences in English: Boost Your Communication Skills English Daily Use Book 8

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Manik Joshi #ad - This book covers the following topics:patterns for creating long sentences01 -- using '-ing form of verbs' i02 -- using '-ing form of verbs' ii03 -- using '-ing form of verbs' iii04 -- using 'with + -ing form of verbs'05 -- using 'series'06 -- Using 'From - To'07 -- Using 'Connecting Words or Phrases'08 -- Using 'Parenthesis'09 -- Miscellaneous PatternsSample This:01 -- Using '-ING Form of Verbs' IExample 01:The ongoing drought in the state is being described as the country's worst in many decades, causing agricultural distress and forcing villagers to move to urban areas looking for work.

Main verb - described-ing form of verbs - causing, forcingExplanation:The ongoing drought in the state is being described as the country's worst in many decades. Drought is causing agricultural distress. Drought is also forcing villagers to move to urban areas looking for work. Example 02:offering huge relief to ten thousand families belonging to the below poverty line category in the state, minister directed Power Corporation Limited to waive pending domestic power bills for last 10 months.

Creating Long Sentences in English: Boost Your Communication Skills English Daily Use Book 8 #ad - Main verb - directed-ing form of verbs - offering, belongingExplanation:Minister directed Power Corporation Limited to waive pending domestic power bills for last 10 months. Minister offered huge relief to ten thousand families. Families belonged to the below poverty line category in the state. Example 03:a deadly winter storm blanketed a huge swath of the US, grounding flights, turning highways into the ice rinks and knocking out power to tens of thousands preparing for the New Year holiday.

Main verb - blanketed-ing form of verbs - grounding, knocking, turning, preparingExplanation:A deadly winter storm blanketed a huge swath of the US.

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Transitional Words and Phrases: Using Transitional Expressions

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#ad - Transitional Expressions -- Emphasis10 Use of transitional word 'furthermore' at the beginning of a sentenceTheir products come with an insurance pack that covers accidental damage, theft, and breakage for a year. Transitional Expressions - Similarity19. Transitional Expressions -- Concession04. Transitional Expressions -- Exception11.

Transitional Expressions -- Contrast07. Transitional expressions -- timeexercise: 1a and 1bexercise: 2a to 2csample this:transitional expressions -- definitionmeaning of 'transition' -- to go from one point to another"Transitional Expressions" = "Transitional Words" + "Transitional Phrases""Transitional or Transition Words" are also known as "connecting words", parts of sentences, "linking phrases" or "signal phrases""Transitional Expressions" also "Transitions" could be defined as follows:*'Transitional expressions' are words or phrases that provide bridges between sentences, "linking words" or "signal words""Transitional or Transition Phrases" are also known as "connecting phrases", paragraphs and sections.

Transitional Words and Phrases: Using Transitional Expressions #ad - Transitional expressions' connect and relate sentences and paragraphs. Transitions expressions' signal the relationship between sentences and paragraphs. Transitions expressions' state the connections between ideas. Transitions expressions' help carry over a thought from one part of a sentence to another, from one section to another, from one sentence to another, from one paragraph to another, or from one idea to another.

Transitional expressions' connect ideas from sentence to sentence and paragraph to paragraph. Transitional expressions' are placed in the beginning, middle, or end of the sentences/paragraphs to explain connections between two or more ideas.

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Dictionary of Prefixes and Suffixes: Useful English Affixes English Word Power Book 5

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Manik Joshi #ad - Affixes, prefixes and suffixesaffixa letter or group of letters added to the beginning or end of a word to get a new word with a changed meaning. Examples -im- in impossible; inter- in international-able in agreeable; -er in learnerEnglish Affixes could be divided into two groups:Prefixes and SuffixesPREFIXA letter or group of letters added to the beginning of a word to get a new word with a changed meaning.

Examples -im- in impossible; inter- in international; un- in unaffectedSUFFIXA letter or group of letters added to the end of a word to get a new word with a changed meaning. Examples --able in agreeable; -er in learner; -ness in quicknesssample this:english prefixes - aa-used to form: adjectives, intelligence, should or must be done; having the characteristic ofexamples:adaptable / antenatal / wearable / antiviral / observable / anti-inflammatory / detectable / manageable / transportable / escapable / agreeable / foreseeable / chargeable / computable / graspable / curable / anti-poaching / decipherable / reasonable / ambidextrous / companionable / anti-malarial / declarable / justifiable / noticeable / honorable / appreciable / translatable / antiretroviral / stoppable / amenable / fashionable / readable / comfortable / anti-graft / ante-room******anti-Used to form: adjectives and nounsGeneral meaning: against; the opposite of; preventingExamples:anti-aircraft / anti-choice / anticyclone / anti-hate / ambivalence / anti-national / anti-bacterial / workable******-abilityUsed to form: nounsGeneral meaning: a level of skill, adverbs and nounsGeneral meaning: not, adverbs and nounsGeneral meaning: both of twoExamples:ambidexterity / antitrust / anti-people / anticlimax / pleasurable / antiparticle / anti-corruption / reachable / understandable / admixture******ambi-Used to form: adjectives, withoutExamples:acellular / doable / questionable / portable / ambivalent******ante-Used to form: adjectives, adverbs and nounsGeneral meaning: that can, tendencyExamples:adjoin / anti-liquor / anti-globalization / antibiotic / anti-terror / amicable / atypical******ad-Used to form: nouns and verbsGeneral meaning: addition, nouns and verbsGeneral meaning: prior to; in front ofExamples:antedate / ratable / imperturbable / anticlockwise / adjudge / payable / transferable / avoidable / imaginable / explainable / believable / anticoagulant / anti-hero / changeable / apolitical / anticlerical / anterior / variable / preventable / washable / explicable / antisocial / controllable / utilizable / anti-copying / antipyretic / anti-terrorism / reputable / anti-rowdy / antifreeze / anti-personnel / indubitable / calculable / enjoyable / antioxidant / breakable / conceivable / antiseptic / antitank / quantifiable / approachable / anti-lock / sociable / anti-stalking / antidepressant / antiperspirant / anti-theft / recognizable / antigravity / assessable / atheism / reckonable / reliable / anti-drug / anti-encroachment / anti-competitive / anti-sabotage / taxable / excitable / serviceable / usable / desirable / exploitable / respectable / amoral / antibody / moveable / anti-extremism / punishable / inevitable / avertable / detestable / atheist / traceable / antivirus******ENGLISH SUFFIXES - A-ableUsed to form: adjectives, etc.

Dictionary of Prefixes and Suffixes: Useful English Affixes English Word Power Book 5 #ad - Examples:capability / workability******-ablyused to form: adverbsgeneral meaning: skillful and well; in a particular mannerexamples:affably / playability / probably / remarkably******-acyUsed to form: nounsGeneral meaning: the position, quality, state or status ofExamples:accuracy / preventability / excitability / unavoidability / notably / charitably / comfortably / reasonably / indisputably / serviceability / inescapability / presumably / demonstrably / curability / usability / irritably / capably / inevitability / inevitably / noticeably / adequacy.

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Dictionary of Category Words: Vocabulary Building English Word Power Book 12

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Manik Joshi #ad - Category words -- Remarks19. Flap -- quick noisy movementexamples: Flapping of Wings | Flapping of Newspaper | Flapping of Steam19. Category words -- Body Marks20 Blast -- the sound of an explosion | sound made by blowing of musical instrumentsExamples: Blast of a Bomb | Blast of a siren05. Category words -- Smells15B.

Boom -- loud deep soundExample: Booming of Guns07. Creak -- a series of sharp soundsExamples: Creaking of a Whip | Creaking of Shoes15. Beat -- sound made by a series of regular blows to somethingExamples: Beating of Drums | Beating of Wings04. Category words -- Religion27A. Category words -- Ways of Thinking03.

Dictionary of Category Words: Vocabulary Building English Word Power Book 12 #ad - Category words -- Ways of Seeing08. Knock -- the sound of somebody hitting a door, window, gate, etc. Examples: knocking of a Door | Knocking of a Window. Category words -- Shapes26. Category words -- Ways of Laughing and Smiling07. Category words -- Fabrics25. Babble -- the sound of many people speaking all togetherExample: Babble of Voices02.

Clatter -- loud noise made by knocking of hard objectsExamples: Clattering of Hoofs | Clattering of Knife13.

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English Interrogative Sentences: Common Interrogative Patterns English Daily Use Book 2

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Manik Joshi #ad - Why + be/do/have/Modal1I. Why + word/words + Be/Do/Have/Modal2I. Interrogatives starting From - Am, Is, Was, Are, Were4B. Interrogatives starting From - Do, Does, Did4C. When + be/do/Have/Modal1C. An interrogative sentence usually changes the word order so that the verb or part of the verb comes before the subject.

When + word/words + Be/Do/Have/Modal2C. They may ask for information or for confirmation or denial of a statement. Whose + be/do/Have/Modal1H. Whom + be/do/Have/Modal1G. Interrogatives starting From - Have, Has, Had4D. Whose + word/words + Be/Do/Have/Modal2H. What + word/words + Be/Do/Have/Modal2B. This book covers the following topics: what are "Interrogative Sentences"?Structure 1 -- Wh-Question Word + Be/Do/Have/Modal1A.

English Interrogative Sentences: Common Interrogative Patterns English Daily Use Book 2 #ad - What + be/do/Have/Modal1B. Following is the list of auxiliary and modal verbs:auxiliary verb-- be-- am, will, ought to, used to, can, should, was, is, does, DidAuxiliary Verb-- Have-- Have, WereAuxiliary Verb-- Do-- Do, Need, Are, Must, Might, HadModal Verbs-- May, Shall, Has, Could, Would, DareYou can begin sentences with these verbs to form Yes/No interrogative sentences.

1a. Who + word/words + Be/Do/Have/Modal2F. Whom + word/words + Be/Do/Have/Modal2G.

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