Rock Breaks Scissors: A Practical Guide to Outguessing and Outwitting Almost Everybody

#ad
Little, Brown Spark #ad - Yet ultimately we're all in the business of anticipating the actions of others. Rock breaks scissors is a hands-on guide to turning life's odds in your favor. Will the next tennis serve go right or left? Will the market go up or down? Most people are poor at that kind of predicting. A practical guide to outguessing everything, from multiple-choice tests to the office football pool to the stock market.

William poundstone demonstrates how to turn this fact to personal advantage in scores of everyday situations, from playing the lottery to buying a home. People are predictable even when they try not to be. Poundstone reveals how to overcome the errors and improve the accuracy of your own outguessing. We are hard-wired to make bum bets on "trends" and "winning streaks" that are illusions.

Rock Breaks Scissors: A Practical Guide to Outguessing and Outwitting Almost Everybody #ad - Rock breaks Scissors is mind-reading for real life.

#ad



Priceless: The Myth of Fair Value and How to Take Advantage of It

#ad
Hill and Wang #ad - Why do text messages cost money, while e-mails are free? Why do jars of peanut butter keep getting smaller in order to keep the price the "same"? The answer is simple: prices are a collective hallucination. In priceless, the bestselling author William Poundstone reveals the hidden psychology of value. In psychological experiments, irrational, people are unable to estimate "fair" prices accurately and are strongly influenced by the unconscious, and politically incorrect.

It hasn't taken long for marketers to apply these findings. People used to download music for free, then Steve Jobs convinced them to pay. Price consultants" advise retailers on how to convince consumers to pay more for less, and negotiation coaches offer similar advice for businesspeople cutting deals. Rooted in the emerging field of behavioral decision theory, Priceless should prove indispensable to anyone who negotiates.

Priceless: The Myth of Fair Value and How to Take Advantage of It #ad - Prada stores carry a few obscenely expensive items in order to boost sales for everything else which look like bargains in comparison. Prices are the most pervasive hidden persuaders of all. That price has a hypnotic effect: the profit margin of the 99 Cents Only store is twice that of Wal-Mart. The new psychology of price dictates the design of price tags, cell phone plans, tort demands, rebates, menus, real estate offers, supermarket aisles, wage packages, "sale" ads, and corporate buyouts.

How? by charging 99 cents.

#ad



The Doomsday Calculation: How an Equation that Predicts the Future Is Transforming Everything We Know About Life and the Universe

#ad
Little, Brown Spark #ad - Now, as the foundation of big data, Bayes' formula has become a linchpin of the digital economy. But here's where things get really interesting: bayes' theorem can also be used to lay odds on the existence of extraterrestrial intelligence; on whether we live in a Matrix-like counterfeit of reality; on the "many worlds" interpretation of quantum theory being correct; and on the biggest question of all: how long will humanity survive?The Doomsday Calculation tells how Silicon Valley's profitable formula became a controversial pivot of contemporary thought.

. From the author of are you smart enough to work at Google?, business, a fascinating look at how an equation that foretells the future is transforming everything we know about life, and the universe. In the 18th century, the british minister and mathematician Thomas Bayes devised a theorem that allowed him to assign probabilities to events that had never happened before.

The Doomsday Calculation: How an Equation that Predicts the Future Is Transforming Everything We Know About Life and the Universe #ad - The doomsday calculation is compelling reading for anyone interested in our culture and its future. It languished in obscurity for centuries until computers came along and made it easy to crunch the numbers. Drawing on interviews with thought leaders around the globe, it's the story of a group of intellectual mavericks who are challenging what we thought we knew about our place in the universe.

#ad



Prisoner's Dilemma: John Von Neumann, Game Theory and the Puzzle of the Bomb

#ad
Anchor #ad - Intellectuals such as von neumann and Bertrand Russell joined military and political leaders in rallying to the "preventive war" movement, which advocated a nuclear first strike against the Soviet Union. Introduced shortly after the Soviet Union acquired the atomic bomb, the prisoner's dilemma quickly became a popular allegory of the nuclear arms race.

A masterful work of science writing, prisoner's dilemma weaves together a biography of the brilliant and tragic von Neumann, a history of pivotal phases of the cold war, and an investigation of game theory's far-reaching influence on public policy today. Most important, prisoner's Dilemma is the incisive story of a revolutionary idea that has been hailed as a landmark of twentieth-century thought.

Prisoner's Dilemma: John Von Neumann, Game Theory and the Puzzle of the Bomb #ad - Though the truman administration rejected preventive war the United States entered into an arms race with the Soviets and game theory developed into a controversial tool of public policy—alternately accused of justifying arms races and touted as the only hope of preventing them. Watching players bluff in a poker game inspired John von Neumann—father of the modern computer and one of the sharpest minds of the century—to construct game theory, a mathematical study of conflict and deception.

Though the answers may seem simple, their profound implications make the prisoner's dilemma one of the great unifying concepts of science. Should you watch public television without pledging? .

#ad



Fortune's Formula: The Untold Story of the Scientific Betting System That Beat the Casinos and Wall Street

#ad
Hill and Wang #ad - One was mathematician claude Shannon, neurotic father of our digital age, whose genius is ranked with Einstein's. They realized that there was even more money to be made in the stock market. Shannon became a successful investor, too, topping even Warren Buffett's rate of return. It reveals the dark side of this alluring scheme, which is founded on exploiting an insider's edge.

Shannon believed it was possible for a smart investor to beat the market—and William Poundstone's Fortune's Formula will convince you that he was right. Thorp used the kelly system with his phenomenally successful hedge fund, Princeton-Newport Partners. Thorp took the "Kelly formula" to Las Vegas. In 1956, two bell labs scientists discovered the scientific formula for getting rich.

Fortune's Formula: The Untold Story of the Scientific Betting System That Beat the Casinos and Wall Street #ad - Kelly Jr. A texas-born, gun-toting physicist. The other was John L. It worked. Together they applied the science of information theory—the basis of computers and the Internet—to the problem of making as much money as possible, as fast as possible. Shannon and MIT mathematician Edward O. Fortune's formula traces how the Kelly formula sparked controversy even as it made fortunes at racetracks, casinos, and trading desks.

#ad



Labyrinths of Reason: Paradox, Puzzles, and the Frailty of Knowledge

#ad
Anchor #ad - This sharply intelligent, consistently provocative book takes the reader on an astonishing, thought-provoking voyage into the realm of delightful uncertainty--a world of paradox in which logical argument leads to contradiction and common sense is seemingly rendered irrelevant.

#ad



Head in the Cloud: Why Knowing Things Still Matters When Facts Are So Easy to Look Up

#ad
Little, Brown Spark #ad - Why should we bother learning facts at all? Bestselling author William Poundstone confronts that timely question in Head in the Cloud. Head in the cloud asks why we're okay with spelling errors on menus but not on resumes; why Fox News viewers don't know which party controls Congress; why people who know "trivia" make more money than those who don't; how individuals can navigate clickbait and media spin to stay informed about what really matters.

More people know who Khloe Kardashian is than who Rene Descartes was. Combining big data survey techniques with eye-opening anecdotes, Poundstone examines what Americans know and don't know on topics ranging from quantum physics to pop culture. But how important is it to fill our heads with facts? A few keystrokes can summon almost any information in seconds.

Head in the Cloud: Why Knowing Things Still Matters When Facts Are So Easy to Look Up #ad - Hilarious, humbling, and wildly entertaining, Head in the Cloud is a must-read for anyone who doesn't know everything. Most can't find delaware on a map, correctly spell the word occurrence, or name the largest ocean on the planet. He shows that many areas of knowledge correlate with the quality of our lives -- wealth, health, and happiness -- and even with politics and behavior.

The real-world value of knowledge in the mobile-device age.

#ad



The Recursive Universe: Cosmic Complexity and the Limits of Scientific Knowledge Dover Books on Science

#ad
Dover Publications #ad - Less of a game than a demonstration of logical possibilities, Life is based on simple rules and produces patterns of light and dark on computer screens that reflect the unpredictability, complexity, and beauty of the universe. This fascinating popular science journey explores Life's relationship to concepts in information theory, explaining the application of natural law to random systems and demonstrating the necessity of limits.

. No winners, also known simply as Life, no losers, and no end — the Game of Life, is no ordinary computer game. Other topics include the paradox of complexity, Big Bang theory, Maxwell's demon, and much more. Created by british mathematician john horton conway in 1970, where it was hailed as the key to a new area of mathematical research, Life debuted in Scientific American, the field of cellular automata.

The Recursive Universe: Cosmic Complexity and the Limits of Scientific Knowledge Dover Books on Science #ad - Written in the 1980s by a bestselling author, the book remains up to date in its treatment of timeless aspects of physics, including the ways in which complex forms and behavior governed by simple laws can appear to arise spontaneously under random conditions.

#ad



Are You Smart Enough to Work at Google?: Trick Questions, Zen-like Riddles, Insanely Difficult Puzzles, and Other Devious Interviewing Techniques You Need ... to Get a Job Anywhere in the New Economy

#ad
Little, Brown Spark #ad - Are you smart enough to work at Google? is a must-read for anyone who wants to succeed in today's job market. The blades start moving in 60 seconds. You are shrunk to the height of a nickel and thrown in a blender. What do you do? if you want to work at Google, or any of America's best companies, you need to have an answer to this and other puzzling questions.

Are you smart enough to work at Google? guides readers through the surprising solutions to dozens of the most challenging interview questions. The book covers the importance of creative thinking, what your Facebook page says about you, ways to get a leg up on the competition, and much more.

#ad



How Would You Move Mount Fuji?: Microsoft's Cult of the Puzzle - How the World's Smartest Companies Select the Most Creative Thinkers

#ad
Little, Brown and Company #ad - Why are beer cans tapered on the end, anyway? From wall street to silicon valley, imagination, employers are using tough and tricky questions to gauge job candidates' intelligence, and problem-solving ability -- qualities needed to survive in today's hypercompetitive global marketplace. Managers seeking the most talented employees will learn to incorporate puzzle interviews in their search for the top candidates.

How would you move mount Fuji? is an indispensable book for anyone in business. He traces the rise and controversial fall of employer-mandated iq tests, the peculiar obsessions of Bill Gates who plays jigsaw puzzles as a competitive sport, the sadistic mind games of Wall Street which reportedly led one job seeker to smash a forty-third-story window, and the bizarre excesses of today's hiring managers who may start off your interview with a box of Legos or a game of virtual Russian roulette.

How Would You Move Mount Fuji?: Microsoft's Cult of the Puzzle - How the World's Smartest Companies Select the Most Creative Thinkers #ad - For the first time, william poundstone reveals the toughest questions used at Microsoft and other Fortune 500 companies -- and supplies the answers. Job seekers will discover how to tackle even the most brain-busting questions, and gain the advantage that could win the job of a lifetime. And anyone who has ever dreamed of going up against the best minds in business may discover that these puzzles are simply a lot of fun.

#ad